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DRAFT: Computer Information Systems (CIS) Learning Guides

PA Department of Education

Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201/52.1201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

100

TASK: Discuss safety protocols and acceptable use policies

Prerequisite Tasks: Individually practiced and identified related tasks within major subgroup numbers 1100, 2100, 3100, and 4100 below as applied to general management of Information Systems (IS) and Computer Programming (Computer Science or Computational Thinking). Completed more than 20 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this task and to the subgroup immediately below. Student documented evidence of prior research including interdisciplinary research/project(s). Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including task numbers listed below. Additional tasks will apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to discuss safety protocols and acceptable use policies with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that discuss safety protocols and acceptable use policies.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
110TASK: Define health and safety regulations
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 109 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to define health and safety regulations with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that define health and safety regulations.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
119TASK: Identify, describe and demonstrate personal, classroom and laboratory safety practices and procedures
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 118 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to identify, describe and demonstrate personal, classroom and laboratory safety practices and procedures with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that identify, describe and demonstrate personal, classroom and laboratory safety practices and procedures.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
120TASK: Illustrate appropriate safe body mechanics, including proper lifting techniques and ergonomics
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 119 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to illustrate appropriate safe body mechanics, including proper lifting techniques and ergonomics with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that illustrate appropriate safe body mechanics, including proper lifting techniques and ergonomics.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
121TASK: Locate emergency equipment in your lab and classroom, including first-aid kits & telephones and including where appropriate: eyewash stations, shower facilities, sinks, fire extinguishers, fire blankets, master power switches&#
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 120 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to locate emergency equipment in your lab and classroom, including first-aid kits & telephones and including where appropriate: eyewash stations, shower facilities, sinks, fire extinguishers, fire blankets, master power switches&# with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that locate emergency equipment in your lab and classroom, including first-aid kits & telephones and including where appropriate: eyewash stations, shower facilities, sinks, fire extinguishers, fire blankets, master power switches&#.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
122TASK: Demonstrate the safe use, storage, and maintenance of every piece of equipment in the lab and classroom
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 121 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to demonstrate the safe use, storage, and maintenance of every piece of equipment in the lab and classroom with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate the safe use, storage, and maintenance of every piece of equipment in the lab and classroom.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
123TASK: Describe safety practices and procedures to be followed when working with and around electricity and including computer hardware
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 122 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to describe safety practices and procedures to be followed when working with and around electricity and including computer hardware with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe safety practices and procedures to be followed when working with and around electricity and including computer hardware.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
125TASK: Demonstrate proper work-space cleaning procedures
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 124 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to demonstrate proper work-space cleaning procedures with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate proper work-space cleaning procedures.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
126TASK: Demonstrate responses to situations that threaten health and safety
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 125 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to demonstrate responses to situations that threaten health and safety with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate responses to situations that threaten health and safety.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
128TASK: Describe the importance of emergency preparedness and an emergency action plan
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 127 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to describe the importance of emergency preparedness and an emergency action plan with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe the importance of emergency preparedness and an emergency action plan.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
129TASK: Illustrate procedures used to handle emergency situations and accidents, including identification, reporting, response, evacuation plans, and follow-up procedures
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 128 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to illustrate procedures used to handle emergency situations and accidents, including identification, reporting, response, evacuation plans, and follow-up procedures with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that illustrate procedures used to handle emergency situations and accidents, including identification, reporting, response, evacuation plans, and follow-up procedures.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
130TASK: Identify practices used to avoid accidents
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 129 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to identify practices used to avoid accidents with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that identify practices used to avoid accidents.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
131TASK: Identify and describe fire protection, precautions and response procedures
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 130 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to identify and describe fire protection, precautions and response procedures with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that identify and describe fire protection, precautions and response procedures.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
132TASK: Discuss the role of the individual and the company/organization in ensuring workplace safety
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 131 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to discuss the role of the individual and the company/organization in ensuring workplace safety with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that discuss the role of the individual and the company/organization in ensuring workplace safety.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
133TASK: Discuss ways to identify and prevent workplace/school violence
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 100 to 132 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to general safety and health information sources, the student will be able to discuss ways to identify and prevent workplace/school violence with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Foundations of Computer Science") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that discuss ways to identify and prevent workplace/school violence.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

1100

TASK: Examine and research the foundations of Computer Information Systems (or CIS)

Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than 270 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this major task. Student individually documented evidence of prior research including interdisciplinary research projects. Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including the benchmark tasks from 1101 to 1145 inclusive. Additional tasks will apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an introduction to computer science, the student will be able to examine and research the foundations of Computer Information Systems (or CIS) with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that examine and research the foundations of Computer Information Systems (or CIS).
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1101TASK: Review school rules, Acceptable Use Policy (AUP), and attendance requirements
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task number: 1100. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a student handbook, the student will be able to review school rules, Acceptable Use Policy (AUP), and attendance requirements with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that review school rules, Acceptable Use Policy (AUP), and attendance requirements.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1102TASK: Review class dress code and the essence of good grooming
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 and 1101. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a student handbook, the student will be able to review class dress code and the essence of good grooming with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that review class dress code and the essence of good grooming.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1103TASK: Recognize the grading policy
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1102 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a student handbook, the student will be able to recognize the grading policy with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that recognize the grading policy.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1104TASK: Define the vocabulary terms 'data' and 'information'
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1103 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to define the vocabulary terms 'data' and 'information' with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that define the vocabulary terms 'data' and 'information'.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1105TASK: Define the vocabulary term 'computational thinking' outside of the computer science discipline
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1104 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), and Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration on the relationship of computer science to other disciplines, the student will be able to define the vocabulary term 'computational thinking' outside of the computer science discipline with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards .

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that define the vocabulary term 'computational thinking' outside of the computer science discipline.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1106TASK: Compare and contrast the following disciplines: Computer Science, Software Engineering, Information Systems, and Information Technology (both literacy and fluency)
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1105 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering discipline, the student will be able to compare and contrast the following disciplines: Computer Science, Software Engineering, Information Systems, and Information Technology (both literacy and fluency) with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that compare and contrast the following disciplines: Computer Science, Software Engineering, Information Systems, and Information Technology (both literacy and fluency).
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1107TASK: Identify general course objectives
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1106 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a course syllabus, the student will be able to identify general course objectives with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that identify general course objectives.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1108TASK: Demonstrate effective interpersonal conflict management skills
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1107 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a role-play exercise on conflict management in the workplace, the student will be able to demonstrate effective interpersonal conflict management skills with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate effective interpersonal conflict management skills.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1109TASK: Differentiate between information technology roles and information system roles
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1108 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a classroom discussion on computer science fundamentals and expectations of professionals in the computer science field, the student will be able to differentiate between information technology roles and information system roles with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that differentiate between information technology roles and information system roles.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1110TASK: Define professional roles within the field of Computer Information Systems (or CIS)
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1109 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a description of an IS discipline and related professional responsibilities, the student will be able to define professional roles within the field of Computer Information Systems (or CIS) with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that define professional roles within the field of Computer Information Systems (or CIS).
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1111TASK: Demonstrate a broad business and a real world perspective
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1110 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a case scenario in the information systems discipline, the student will be able to demonstrate a broad business and a real world perspective with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate a broad business and a real world perspective.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1112TASK: Promote successful performance among peers
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1111 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a group exercise, the student will be able to promote successful performance among peers with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that promote successful performance among peers.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1113TASK: Automate business operations without downsizing staff or production
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1112 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a paper pseudo-business model, the student will be able to automate business operations without downsizing staff or production with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that automate business operations without downsizing staff or production.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1114TASK: Properly align digital information systems with an organization's strategic plan
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1113 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a common business case scenario, the student will be able to properly align digital information systems with an organization's strategic plan with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that properly align digital information systems with an organization's strategic plan.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1115TASK: Independently demonstrate strong analytical and critical thinking skills
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1114 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to independently demonstrate strong analytical and critical thinking skills with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that independently demonstrate strong analytical and critical thinking skills.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1116TASK: Use system concepts for understanding and framing problems
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1115 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to use system concepts for understanding and framing problems with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that use system concepts for understanding and framing problems.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1117TASK: Practice solving problems before actually implementing a solution
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1116 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to practice solving problems before actually implementing a solution with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that practice solving problems before actually implementing a solution.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1118TASK: Apply both traditional and new concepts and skills
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1117 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to apply both traditional and new concepts and skills with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that apply both traditional and new concepts and skills.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1119TASK: Understand that a system consists of people, data, procedures, software, & hardware (by degree)
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1118 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to understand that a system consists of people, data, procedures, software, & hardware (by degree) with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that understand that a system consists of people, data, procedures, software, & hardware (by degree).
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1120TASK: Exhibit strong ethical principles
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1119 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to exhibit strong ethical principles with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that exhibit strong ethical principles.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1121TASK: Employ good interpersonal communication & team skills
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1120 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to employ good interpersonal communication & team skills with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that employ good interpersonal communication & team skills.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1122TASK: Adopt a professional code of conduct
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1121 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to adopt a professional code of conduct with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that adopt a professional code of conduct.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1123TASK: Collaborate to successful reinforce individual efforts
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1122 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to collaborate to successful reinforce individual efforts with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that collaborate to successful reinforce individual efforts.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1124TASK: Employ effective listening skills
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1123 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to employ effective listening skills with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that employ effective listening skills.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1125TASK: Demonstrate persuasiveness through writing & speaking
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1124 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate persuasiveness through writing & speaking with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate persuasiveness through writing & speaking.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1126TASK: Show awareness of opportunities for ongoing education
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1125 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to show awareness of opportunities for ongoing education with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that show awareness of opportunities for ongoing education.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1127TASK: Maintain a positive work ethic and attitude
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1126 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to maintain a positive work ethic and attitude with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that maintain a positive work ethic and attitude.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1128TASK: Demonstrate attitude for success
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1127 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate attitude for success with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate attitude for success.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1129TASK: Display persistence, curiosity, creativity, risk taking, & a tolerance of these abilities in others
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1128 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to display persistence, curiosity, creativity, risk taking, & a tolerance of these abilities in others with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that display persistence, curiosity, creativity, risk taking, & a tolerance of these abilities in others.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1130TASK: Design and implement information technology solutions that enhance organizational performance
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1129 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to design and implement information technology solutions that enhance organizational performance with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that design and implement information technology solutions that enhance organizational performance.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1131TASK: Properly model organizational processes
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1130 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to properly model organizational processes with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that properly model organizational processes.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1132TASK: Implement and manage technical processes
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1131 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to implement and manage technical processes with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that implement and manage technical processes.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1133TASK: Apply techniques for acquiring, converting, transmitting, & storing data
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1132 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to apply techniques for acquiring, converting, transmitting, & storing data with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that apply techniques for acquiring, converting, transmitting, & storing data.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1134TASK: Focus upon the application of information technology in helping individuals, groups, & organizations achieve their goals
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1133 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to focus upon the application of information technology in helping individuals, groups, & organizations achieve their goals with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that focus upon the application of information technology in helping individuals, groups, & organizations achieve their goals.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1135TASK: Provide users with technical support for computer problems
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1134 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to provide users with technical support for computer problems with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that provide users with technical support for computer problems.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1136TASK: Install hardware & software solutions
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1135 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to install hardware & software solutions with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that install hardware & software solutions.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1137TASK: Troubleshoot hardware & software problems
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1136 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to troubleshoot hardware & software problems with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that troubleshoot hardware & software problems.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1138TASK: Simulate a solution's accuracy then re-evaluate
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1137 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to simulate a solution's accuracy then re-evaluate with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that simulate a solution's accuracy then re-evaluate.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1139TASK: Count in base 2, 8, or 16 numbering systems
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1138 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to count in base 2, 8, or 16 numbering systems with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that count in base 2, 8, or 16 numbering systems.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1140TASK: Design basic finite state machines
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1139 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to design basic finite state machines with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that design basic finite state machines.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1141TASK: Responsibly use software in the lab
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1140 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to responsibly use software in the lab with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that responsibly use software in the lab.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1142TASK: Demonstrate the ethical use of computer technology
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1141 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate the ethical use of computer technology with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate the ethical use of computer technology.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1143TASK: Explore problems: solving heuristically & strategically
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1142 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to explore problems: solving heuristically & strategically with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that explore problems: solving heuristically & strategically.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1144TASK: Recognize computationally hard problems (NP-C)
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1143 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to recognize computationally hard problems (NP-C) with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that recognize computationally hard problems (NP-C).
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1145TASK: Identify unsolvable problems (Does P = NP?)
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1100 to 1144 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to identify unsolvable problems (Does P = NP?) with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that identify unsolvable problems (Does P = NP?).
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

1200

TASK: Develop an individual career plan and research project

Prerequisite Tasks: Individually practiced tasks from 1101 to 1145 inclusive. Completed more than 20 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this task and to the subgroup immediately below. Student documented evidence of prior research including an interdisciplinary research project(s). Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including task numbers listed below. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to develop an individual career plan and research project with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that develop an individual career plan and research project.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1201TASK: Investigate career options
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task number: 1200. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a classified job advertisement section from a local news agency, the student will be able to investigate career options with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that investigate career options.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1202TASK: Develop career goals
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 and 1201. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a basic document template framed upon a student's interest, aptitudes, and research, the student will be able to develop career goals with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that develop career goals.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1203TASK: Plan and modify goals on an annual basis
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1202 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an online career account/survey from the Department of Education, the student will be able to plan and modify goals on an annual basis with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that plan and modify goals on an annual basis.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1204TASK: Manage personal and career goals
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1203 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to manage personal and career goals with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that manage personal and career goals.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1205TASK: Describe factors that contribute to job satisfaction and success
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1204 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to describe factors that contribute to job satisfaction and success with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe factors that contribute to job satisfaction and success.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1220TASK: Prepare for employment
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1219 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to prepare for employment with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that prepare for employment.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1221TASK: Develop a resume
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1220 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to develop a resume with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that develop a resume.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1222TASK: Complete a job application process
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1221 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to complete a job application process with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that complete a job application process.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1223TASK: Demonstrate interviewing skills
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1222 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate interviewing skills with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate interviewing skills.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1230TASK: Participate in work-based learning experiences
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1229 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to participate in work-based learning experiences with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that participate in work-based learning experiences.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1231TASK: Use technology appropriate for the job
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1230 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to use technology appropriate for the job with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that use technology appropriate for the job.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1232TASK: Demonstrate positive work behaviors
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1231 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate positive work behaviors with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate positive work behaviors.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1233TASK: Demonstrate positive interpersonal behaviors
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1232 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate positive interpersonal behaviors with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate positive interpersonal behaviors.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1234TASK: Demonstrate safe and healthy work behaviors
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1233 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate safe and healthy work behaviors with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate safe and healthy work behaviors.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1235TASK: Adapt to changes in the workplace
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1234 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to adapt to changes in the workplace with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that adapt to changes in the workplace.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1240TASK: Demonstrate oral communications
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1239 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate oral communications with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate oral communications.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1241TASK: Conduct formal and informal research to collect appropriate topical information
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1240 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to conduct formal and informal research to collect appropriate topical information with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that conduct formal and informal research to collect appropriate topical information.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1242TASK: Use questioning techniques to obtain needed information from audience
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1241 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to use questioning techniques to obtain needed information from audience with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that use questioning techniques to obtain needed information from audience.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1243TASK: Interpret oral and nonverbal communications of audience
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1242 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to interpret oral and nonverbal communications of audience with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that interpret oral and nonverbal communications of audience.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1244TASK: Demonstrate active listening during communications
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1243 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate active listening during communications with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate active listening during communications.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1245TASK: Demonstrate appropriate technologies for a formal presentation
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1244 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate appropriate technologies for a formal presentation with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate appropriate technologies for a formal presentation.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1246TASK: Prepare and deliver presentations
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1245 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to prepare and deliver presentations with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that prepare and deliver presentations.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1247TASK: Deliver presentation incorporating both appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication techniques
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1246 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to deliver presentation incorporating both appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication techniques with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that deliver presentation incorporating both appropriate verbal and nonverbal communication techniques.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1248TASK: Communicate using equitable and culturally sensitive language for a diverse audience
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1247 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to communicate using equitable and culturally sensitive language for a diverse audience with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that communicate using equitable and culturally sensitive language for a diverse audience.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1250TASK: Demonstrate written communications
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1249 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate written communications with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate written communications.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1251TASK: Conduct formal research to collect appropriate information
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1250 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to conduct formal research to collect appropriate information with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that conduct formal research to collect appropriate information.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1252TASK: Organize information and develop an outline
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1251 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to organize information and develop an outline with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that organize information and develop an outline.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1253TASK: Write an appropriate business communication
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1252 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a written case scenario from the workplace, the student will be able to write an appropriate business communication with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that write an appropriate business communication.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1254TASK: Prepare and proof a draft report
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1253 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given an appropriate technology and information system(s), the student will be able to prepare and proof a draft report with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that prepare and proof a draft report.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1255TASK: Utilize electronic format for written and presentation communications
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1200 to 1254 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to utilize electronic format for written and presentation communications with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that utilize electronic format for written and presentation communications.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

1300

TASK: Configure LAMP, MAMP, and WAMP web servers on an Intel based PC

Prerequisite Tasks: Individually practiced tasks from 1101 to 1145 inclusive. Completed more than 20 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this task and to the subgroup immediately below. Student documented evidence of prior research including an interdisciplinary research project(s). Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including task numbers listed below. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to configure LAMP, MAMP, and WAMP web servers on an Intel based PC with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that configure LAMP, MAMP, and WAMP web servers on an Intel based PC.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

1400

TASK: Assemble a High Performance Cluster (HPC) for the purpose of distributed processing

Prerequisite Tasks: Individually practiced tasks from 1101 to 1145 inclusive. Completed more than 20 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this task and to the subgroup immediately below. Student documented evidence of prior research including an interdisciplinary research project(s). Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including task numbers listed below. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to assemble a High Performance Cluster (HPC) for the purpose of distributed processing with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that assemble a High Performance Cluster (HPC) for the purpose of distributed processing.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

1500

TASK: Research and evaluate several High Performance Clusters (HPCs) currently used by local business corporations

Prerequisite Tasks: Individually practiced tasks from 1101 to 1145 inclusive. Completed more than 20 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this task and to the subgroup immediately below. Student documented evidence of prior research including an interdisciplinary research project(s). Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including task numbers listed below. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to research and evaluate several High Performance Clusters (HPCs) currently used by local business corporations with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that research and evaluate several High Performance Clusters (HPCs) currently used by local business corporations.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

1600

TASK: Evaluate the role of the information technology industry in the economy

Prerequisite Tasks: Individually practiced tasks from 1101 to 1145 inclusive. Completed more than 20 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this task and to the subgroup immediately below. Student documented evidence of prior research including an interdisciplinary research project(s). Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including task numbers listed below. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to evaluate the role of the information technology industry in the economy with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that evaluate the role of the information technology industry in the economy.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1601TASK: Evaluate the role of information technology on local and international economies
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task number: 1600. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to evaluate the role of information technology on local and international economies with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that evaluate the role of information technology on local and international economies.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1602TASK: Compare/contrast the advantages/disadvantages of working as an independent consultant
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 and 1601. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to compare/contrast the advantages/disadvantages of working as an independent consultant with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that compare/contrast the advantages/disadvantages of working as an independent consultant.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1605TASK: Analyze the relationship of customer service and customer satisfaction on the success of a business
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1604 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to analyze the relationship of customer service and customer satisfaction on the success of a business with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that analyze the relationship of customer service and customer satisfaction on the success of a business.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1620TASK: Demonstrate business and financial management practices for an independent consultant
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1619 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate business and financial management practices for an independent consultant with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate business and financial management practices for an independent consultant.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1621TASK: Research and identify costs associated with supplying services in the Information Systems field
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1620 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to research and identify costs associated with supplying services in the Information Systems field with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that research and identify costs associated with supplying services in the Information Systems field.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1622TASK: Interpret financial information for decision making and planning
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1621 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to interpret financial information for decision making and planning with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that interpret financial information for decision making and planning.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1630TASK: Monitor and adjust business operation based on financial performance
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1629 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to monitor and adjust business operation based on financial performance with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that monitor and adjust business operation based on financial performance.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1640TASK: Evaluate leadership styles appropriate for the workplace
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1639 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to evaluate leadership styles appropriate for the workplace with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that evaluate leadership styles appropriate for the workplace.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1641TASK: Determine the roles and responsibilities that leaders and members bring to an organization
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1640 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to determine the roles and responsibilities that leaders and members bring to an organization with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that determine the roles and responsibilities that leaders and members bring to an organization.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1642TASK: Compare/contrast leadership and management styles
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1641 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to compare/contrast leadership and management styles with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that compare/contrast leadership and management styles.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1643TASK: Describe how cultural/ethnic differences affect leadership styles within a group
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1642 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to describe how cultural/ethnic differences affect leadership styles within a group with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe how cultural/ethnic differences affect leadership styles within a group.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1645TASK: Describe how cultural/ethnic differences affect interpersonal interactions/communications within a group
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1644 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to describe how cultural/ethnic differences affect interpersonal interactions/communications within a group with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe how cultural/ethnic differences affect interpersonal interactions/communications within a group.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1650TASK: Participate in leadership activities such as those supported by career and technical student organizations
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1649 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to participate in leadership activities such as those supported by career and technical student organizations with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that participate in leadership activities such as those supported by career and technical student organizations.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1651TASK: Determine the roles and responsibilities that leaders and members bring to a student organization
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1650 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to determine the roles and responsibilities that leaders and members bring to a student organization with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that determine the roles and responsibilities that leaders and members bring to a student organization.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1652TASK: Evaluate characteristics of an effective team player
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1651 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to evaluate characteristics of an effective team player with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that evaluate characteristics of an effective team player.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1653TASK: Evaluate characteristics of effective teams
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1652 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to evaluate characteristics of effective teams with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that evaluate characteristics of effective teams.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1654TASK: Practice techniques to involve each member of the team
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1653 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to practice techniques to involve each member of the team with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that practice techniques to involve each member of the team.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1655TASK: Demonstrate team-work
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1654 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate team-work with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate team-work.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1656TASK: Practice effective meeting management
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1655 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to practice effective meeting management with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that practice effective meeting management.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1657TASK: Develop and implement a personal and professional improvement plan
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1656 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to develop and implement a personal and professional improvement plan with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that develop and implement a personal and professional improvement plan.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1658TASK: Demonstrate business etiquette
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1657 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate business etiquette with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate business etiquette.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1659TASK: Practice decision-making process
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1658 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to practice decision-making process with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that practice decision-making process.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1660TASK: Demonstrate positive business and work ethics
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1659 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate positive business and work ethics with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate positive business and work ethics.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1661TASK: Distinguish between personal values and goals
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1660 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to distinguish between personal values and goals with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that distinguish between personal values and goals.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1662TASK: Evaluate how values and goals are displayed as a work ethic
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1661 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to evaluate how values and goals are displayed as a work ethic with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that evaluate how values and goals are displayed as a work ethic.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1663TASK: Explain how initiatives and the willingness to learn new information impact interpersonal relationships in the workplace
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1662 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to explain how initiatives and the willingness to learn new information impact interpersonal relationships in the workplace with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that explain how initiatives and the willingness to learn new information impact interpersonal relationships in the workplace.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1664TASK: Demonstrate dependable punctuality and to adhere to a work schedule and deadlines
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1663 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate dependable punctuality and to adhere to a work schedule and deadlines with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate dependable punctuality and to adhere to a work schedule and deadlines.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1665TASK: Express feelings and ideas in an appropriate manner for the workplace
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1664 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to express feelings and ideas in an appropriate manner for the workplace with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that express feelings and ideas in an appropriate manner for the workplace.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1666TASK: Demonstrate appropriate manners for accepting/giving feedback and evaluation in employer/employee interactions
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1665 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate appropriate manners for accepting/giving feedback and evaluation in employer/employee interactions with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate appropriate manners for accepting/giving feedback and evaluation in employer/employee interactions.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1671TASK: Convey the rights/responsibilities electronic communications usage to the end users
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1670 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to convey the rights/responsibilities electronic communications usage to the end users with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that convey the rights/responsibilities electronic communications usage to the end users.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1672TASK: Comply with license agreements and copyright laws
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1671 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to comply with license agreements and copyright laws with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that comply with license agreements and copyright laws.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1673TASK: Compare the rights of an organization with the rights of users of electronic communications
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1672 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to compare the rights of an organization with the rights of users of electronic communications with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that compare the rights of an organization with the rights of users of electronic communications.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1680TASK: Demonstrate the comprehension of basic computer mathematics
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1679 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to demonstrate the comprehension of basic computer mathematics with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that demonstrate the comprehension of basic computer mathematics.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1681TASK: Explain the function of general mathematics as it relates to computer hardware
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1680 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to explain the function of general mathematics as it relates to computer hardware with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that explain the function of general mathematics as it relates to computer hardware.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1685TASK: Perform binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal number conversions to solve problems with hardware configuration
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1684 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively), the student will be able to perform binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal number conversions to solve problems with hardware configuration with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that perform binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal number conversions to solve problems with hardware configuration.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1690TASK: Describe the development/evolution of the computer
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1689 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to describe the development/evolution of the computer with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe the development/evolution of the computer.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1691TASK: Describe a computer, it's components and their functions
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1690 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to describe a computer, it's components and their functions with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe a computer, it's components and their functions.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1692TASK: Explain the historical evolution of the computer
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1691 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to explain the historical evolution of the computer with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that explain the historical evolution of the computer.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.
1695TASK: Explain how the development of computers has impacted modern life
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 1600 to 1694 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Network & Computer Systems Administrators/Trainees (SOC 15-1142), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111), and Computer Hardware Engineers (SOC 17-2061)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration, an Internet-based research exercise, or a list of acceptable principles under the umbrella of a computer science discipline, the student will be able to explain how the development of computers has impacted modern life with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE or school policy).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Science Foundations") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Introduction to Computing Systems (All CIS Students, ISBN-10: 0072467509); Bebop to the Boolean Boogie, An Unconventional Guide to Electronics (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1856175074); The Definitive Guide to How Computers Do Math : Featuring the Virtual DIY Calculator (CIS Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0471732785); How Computers Work (ISBN-13: 978-0789736130); JFLAP: An Interactive Formal Language and Automata Package (ISBN-13: 9780763738341); Invent Your Own Computer Games with Python by Al Sweigart (FREE Online); Python Programming for the Absolute Beginner (ISBN-13: 978-1435455009); Programming Video Games for the Evil Genius (All CIS Students, ISBN-13: 978-0071497527); Underlying Principles and Concepts in Computer Science (LEVEL 1 Prerequisites); Computer Science in the Modern World (LEVEL 2); Computer Science as Analysis and Design (LEVEL 3); and Topics in Computer Science (LEVEL 4).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that explain how the development of computers has impacted modern life.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  5. Practice counting in binary, octal, and hexadecimal then compare to our decimal numbering system.
  6. Review the JFLAP Website from Duke University.
  7. Download and use the JFLAP software to begin experimenting with formal computer languages.


Task Number
Evaluations

Computer Information Systems Task and Purpose
Performance Objective and Learning Activity (CIP 11.0201)

CIS/CS Prerequisite Tasks and Safety Factors
Resources and Suggested Hyperlinks

2100

TASK: Create, modify, compile, and execute computer algorithms from an open source

Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than 270 hours of study within the computer science discipline relating to this major task. Student individually documented evidence of prior research including interdisciplinary research projects. Successfully completed all teacher assignments and projects including the benchmark tasks from 2101 to 2145 inclusive. Additional tasks will apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given an introduction to computer programming and several code examples, the student will be able to create, modify, compile, and execute computer algorithms from an open source with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that create, modify, compile, and execute computer algorithms from an open source.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2101TASK: Recall every line of code within the source algorithm
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task number: 2100. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given an introduction and a fundamental Hello-World algorithm, the student will be able to recall every line of code within the source algorithm with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that recall every line of code within the source algorithm.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2102TASK: Label and define major sections of an algorithm
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 and 2101. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given an introduction and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to label and define major sections of an algorithm with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that label and define major sections of an algorithm.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2103TASK: Underline or highlight built-in commands/functions
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2102 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to underline or highlight built-in commands/functions with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight built-in commands/functions.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2104TASK: Underline or highlight literals
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2103 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to underline or highlight literals with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight literals.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2105TASK: Underline or highlight primitive variables
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2104 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to underline or highlight primitive variables with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight primitive variables.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2106TASK: Underline or highlight data structures when defined
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2105 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to underline or highlight data structures when defined with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight data structures when defined.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
2107TASK: Underline or highlight value parameters
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2106 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with programmer-defined functions or objects, the student will be able to underline or highlight value parameters with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight value parameters.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2108TASK: Underline or highlight reference parameters
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2107 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with programmer-defined functions or objects, the student will be able to underline or highlight reference parameters with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight reference parameters.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2109TASK: Underline or highlight function prototypes
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2108 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the computer science, software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with programmer-defined functions or objects, the student will be able to underline or highlight function prototypes with eighty percent (80%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that underline or highlight function prototypes.
  3. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2110TASK: Locate all syntax errors
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed more than five (5) hours of study within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2109 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the software engineering, information systems, and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with grammar errors, the student will be able to locate all syntax errors with eighty-five percent (85%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that locate all syntax errors.
  2. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  3. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  4. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
2111TASK: Discuss various side-effects that may occur
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2110 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with known semantic errors, the student will be able to discuss various side-effects that may occur with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that discuss various side-effects that may occur.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2112TASK: Restate major sections of an algorithm
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2111 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to restate major sections of an algorithm with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that restate major sections of an algorithm.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2113TASK: Explain built-in commands/functions
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2112 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to explain built-in commands/functions with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that explain built-in commands/functions.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2114TASK: Describe literals
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2113 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to describe literals with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that describe literals.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2115TASK: Recognize primitive variables
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the computer science discipline in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2114 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information technology discipline. Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to recognize primitive variables with one hundred percent (100%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
  3. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that recognize primitive variables.
  4. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
2116TASK: Review data structures when defined
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2115 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and a functional algorithm, the student will be able to review data structures when defined with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that review data structures when defined.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2117TASK: Identify value parameters
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2116 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with programmer-defined functions or objects, the student will be able to identify value parameters with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically): Karel The Robot: A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming (Primer, ISBN-13: 978-0471597254); Teach Yourself Programming in Ten Years (Level 1, Free Online); Fundamentals of C++: Introductory Course (Level 1, ISBN-13: 978-0538695596); Computer Science: A Structured Approach Using C++ (Levels 1 & 2, ISBN-13: 978-0534374808); Starting Out with Java: From Control Structures through Data Structures (Level 2, ISBN-13: 978-0136080206); Starting Out with C++: From Control Structures through Objects (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0321545886); Introduction to Programming with C++ (Level 3, ISBN-13: 978-0-13-611014-9); Assembly Language for x86 Processors, Sixth Edition (NOOK Study eTextbook) (Level 4, ISBN-13: 978-0136022121); Beginning Game Programming (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0672326592); Game Coding Complete (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-1584506805); Killer Game Programming in Java (Supplement, ISBN-13: 978-0596007300).

Suggested Hyperlinks:
  1. Visit and carefully review the CIS.TCHS.INFO website.
  2. Use Google's Safe-Search to find information and related articles that identify value parameters.
  3. Register and login to algorithmically solve problems located at following URL: http://ProjectEuler.net/
  4. Locate and review similar tasks presented on SchoolTube.com.
2118TASK: Identify reference parameters
Prerequisite Tasks: Completed several hours of study within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively) in support of this task. Prior cumulative research evidence by the student must include reference to the following task numbers: 2100 to 2117 inclusive. Additional tasks may apply.

Safety Factors: All classroom and student handbook policies apply to this task. Student will comply with established acceptable use policies regarding their personal computer at all times. No food or drink is allowed within the designated computer laboratory.
Practice DatesStudent Signature Purpose: Students who successfully complete this task will have a better understanding of the lifelong educational opportunities that exist within the college of Computer Science. Related career responsibilities for this task are also identified within the information systems and information technology disciplines (respectively). Graduate students that hold a bachelor's degree in computer science may explore the following careers related to this task (by degree):

Computer Programmers (SOC 15-1131), Software Application Developers (SOC 15-1132), Software System Developers (SOC 15-1133), Web Developers/Programmers (SOC 15-1134), Computer Systems Analysts (SOC 15-1121), Information Security Analysts (SOC 15-1122), Database Administrators/BCNF Practice (SOC 15-1141), Computer and Information Systems Managers/Trainees (SOC 11-3021), Computer Science Teachers/Exploratory (SOC 25-1021), and Computers and Information Research Scientists/Apprenticeship (SOC 15-1111)
Teacher Evaluation (Work-In-Progress at http://cistasks.tchs.info/cisLGuides.php)

Performance Objective (Final Draft): Given a lecture/demonstration and an algorithm with programmer-defined functions or objects, the student will be able to identify reference parameters with ninety percent (90%) accuracy based on the Association of Computing Machinery and the Computer Science Teacher Association (ACM/CSTA) academic standards including published standards of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

Learning Activity: Read, review, and familiarize yourself with the resources and suggested hyperlinks presented for this task. Digitally research corresponding articles with Google's Safe-Search then utilize Dictionary.com to define all task related vocabulary terms. Additional information will be posted on the CIS.TCHS.INFO school website (under the subheading "Computer Programming") or on the SchoolTube.com website.

(Reviewed Sunday June 20th, 2021)
Resources and Textbooks (Listed Chronologically):